10 Meatless High-Protein Foods

If you prefer chickpeas to chicken, keep in mind you still need 2 to 3 servings of protein per day. These 10 meatless foods are high in protein and will help to keep your body strong and healthy, sans the meat.

Vegetarian Protein Sources

Vegetarian Protein Sources

Whether you’ve decided to go meatless once a week or adopted a full vegetarian lifestyle, you need to keep nutrition on the front burner. Since you’ve nixed the meat, making sure your body is getting enough protein to stay strong is crucial. Protein functions to build and maintain your body, fight off disease, and keep energy levels high to you can stay alert all day. While it may seem difficult to get a full dose of protein per day (on average 46g for women, 56g for men), implementing a few of these high-protein foods into your diet can help you reach those protein goals.

Eggs

Protein: 6g per egg

Egg-Salad-for-Breakfast

Start your day off right with protein-packed eggs. This will give your morning a boost and fuel you until lunch. Cooking with eggs brings breakfast to a whole new level. Mix it up a bit with omelets and quiche or try cooking eggs scrambled, poached, hard-boiled, or sunny-side-up.

Cottage Cheese

Protein: 13g per ½-cup

Cottage cheese serves as great snack. It’s affordable, comes in reduced-fat versions, and also contains calcium to keep your bones strong. But you can also hide it in creamy dishes, or sub it out for ricotta cheese or sour cream in certain dishes too. Try combining with fresh veggies for a savory treat, or adding fruit and cinnamon for something more sweet.

Quinoa

Protein: 8g per 1 cup (cooked)

Pronounced KEEN-WAH, this wonder grain is not only high in protein but also low in cholesterol and a good source of iron and fiber. Eating quinoa often is a good idea for vegetarians or anyone looking for a healthy protein. Plus, some varieties only take 20 minutes to cook – you’ll know it’s done when it turns slightly translucent.

You can make quinoa salads, or use instead of rice for a higher protein whole-grain.

Pumpkin Seeds

Protein: 7g per 1 oz

Also known as pepitas, pumpkin seeds are a great grab-and-go snack or topping for salads and soups. While they are available year-round in stores, you can roast fresh seeds at home in fall, when pumpkins come into season. Nuts and seeds can be high in calories and fat so be mindful of your serving sizes.

Continue reading here: http://www.cookinglight.com/food/vegetarian/protein-for-vegetarians/pumpkin-seeds

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